"Think Advisor" Articles

Weekend reading 2022 tax tips Weekend reading 2022 tax tips
Weekend Reading: Ed Slott: Hold Off on Backdoor Roths, and More Tips for Tax Season in 2022

With new tax and retirement legislation looming ahead, it’s more important than ever to be proactive when it comes to your tax efficiency.

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Weekend Reading: The Hidden Hazards of Taking a Social Security Lump Sum

When it comes to deciding whether you should claim Social Security benefits at Full Retirement Age (FRA), or delay and receive credit, several factors come into play which you should be aware of.

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Weekend Reading: What to Do When Your Married Clients Can't Agree on Retirement Planning

If you and your spouse have differing viewpoints on how to handle your retirement plan, the good news is, you can still find common ground in your strategy while also fulfilling your wishes when it comes to money matters.

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Weekend Reading: How to Help Clients Maximize Social Security Benefits

Deciding when to claim your Social Security benefits can have a large impact on your retirement income, and many individuals aren’t making the most of it. In fact, only about four percent of retirees are making the optimal Social Security claiming decision, which results in a loss of about $2.1 trillion in wealth.

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Weekend Reading: Kitces: The Big Problem with 'Risk Tolerance'

Retirement portfolio risk is a complex topic, and one of my favorite financial experts, Michael Kitces, is revealing why.

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Weekend Reading: Long-Term Care: Which Retirees Will Need It, and How Much?

Wondering if you’ll need long-term care in retirement? A new study by the Center for Retirement Research at Boston College reports that at a high level, about a quarter of retirees will require long-term care, while 20 percent will not.